Darren Main on the Source

“If you’re able to keep returning to your focus point (in meditation), you can move still deeper into the mind and experience the true Self, because underneath these three basic levels of consciousness (conscious mind, semi-conscious mind, unconscious mind) there is a fourth.  For simplicity, I’ll refer to it as the source.  It’s important to note that all minds originate from the same source point.  This point has many names originating in many cultures.  A simple Western name would be God.  Eastern names would include the Tao and Brahman.  Albert Einstein referred to this source as the Unified Field.  Whatever you call this Source, it’s important to remember that it exists within every mind.

This source point is the origin of all thought……it’s a formless thought of pure joy, bliss and love.  This thought is present within you at this very moment and at every moment, though it’s likely to be buried under layers of physical, emotional and psychological baggage.

It is this source point that we’re trying to realize when we practice yoga.”

-Darren Main, Yoga and the Path of the Urban Mystic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working With Coyote

C.M. Rivers

In working with Coyote – the trickster who tricks even himself – there can be no rigid thinking, no frame around the picture.  Perceptions are dissolved, expectations are deconstructed.  One must take oneself less seriously, welcome laughter, crack open the shell of one’s own ego.

An open heart is required, and it is like the open road: lending itself to endless possibilities, allowing whatever wants to come next to happen, inviting the mind to loosen its grip on everything it has convinced itself of, softening into fearlessness and deep listening.

The processes of nature, miracles all.  How full of folly we are, how powerful, how small.

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Quote from Iyengar

“Yoga teaches us to cure what need not be endured, and endure what cannot be cured.”

B.K.S. Iyengar

Say Yes

C.M. Rivers

Say yes to storms, stillness, success, failure, silence, noise. Yes to high winds, bitter cold, sweltering heat, crushing loneliness, joyful connection, isolation, liberation.

Yes to the broken and the unbreakable.  Yes to the shaken and the unshakeable.

Say yes to danger, safety, pain, pleasure, exhaustion, energy.  Yes to the suffering you’ve known and the gifts you’ve been given.  Yes to a small and closed-in place, yes to the mystery of limitless space.

Say yes to old hurts, fresh wounds.  Yes to your rise and yes to your fall, to effort and ease.  Yes to the fields of time and timelessness.

Say yes to all the things you think you could never do or be, yes to anything you’re afraid of.  Yes to duality and oneness.  In saying yes, you become unstuck.  When you say yes, nothing can hold you hostage.

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Light My Way

C.M. Rivers

May my heart light my way.  May it come into a place not unlike the narrow line that exists between water and fire, a pocket of stillness where both forces are within reach.  Then I could learn their ways, how to call on them, how to let them enter me, how to recognize which one is called for.  Then I might discover how to refuse nothing, yet also how to hold on to nothing.

May my heart find peace.  May it find a way to be supported by the great net of life – the embroidery of things – and not lose itself in the intricate mesh.  Then it might remember to bow more readily, honoring what support it has already found.

Having lost my way many times before, may I more easily recognize those paths and not start down them again.  May I light my way instead of losing…

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Quote by Matt Licata

Enter deeply into your neurosis, your anxiety, your panic, your confusion, your suffering, and your fear – get to know it’s textures, qualities and fragrances, and allow it to take you into the secret chamber buried inside your own body.  For within the mandala of tender ripe aliveness there are jewels beyond the mind.  – Matt Licata

Quote from Darren Main

“As a modern yogi, the key to finding peace through yoga is to keep coming back to the practice.  It doesn’t matter how often we get distracted by the ego, or for how long we play the ego’s game.  The only thing that matters is that we return.  Eventually the pain of living under the ego’s rule will wear down even the most stubborn person.  Surrender is inevitable, but the road between guilt and surrender can be long and painful.”   -Darren Main, from Yoga and the Path of the Urban Mystic