Weather Report

To better understand nature you need to spend some time in it alone, observing.  The more you do this, the more quietly aware you’ll become of what is happening there – the order, science, art, survival.

The same applies to one’s body and mind, habits, tendencies, perpetual states, thoughts that come and go, emotions that change and pass.  The solid and fluid.  The blurry and congruent.  The daily weather report of moods.

Luggage

Identify the contents.  How do they serve you?  Decide what to set down, what to carry.  Letting go is difficult.  Holding on is difficult.  Maybe you learn how to shift the weight, carry it differently.

Field Row’s End

ox turns at field row’s end

the onions, tomatoes, zucchini and dill

 

the luminous strands of March

get up, get ready, to work, to begin

 

get up, get ready, to work, to follow

the arc of the world, the slope of the light

 

earth beneath thumbnail

knees pressed in soil

 

clods of mud smear rubber boots

and we, the workers

 

anchored to weather

with its moods, whims, dictations

 

we, the workers

fastened to the ox and the engine of his breath

 

fastened to the fields

splashing around in our patience

 

working until it is no longer work,

but who we are and what we do

 

settling down to seek the stillness of evening

we have become the work itself

 

we are the field, the ox

we are the onions, the mud

 

watching attentively, listening closely

viewing ourselves as if through a microscope

 

the metronome held in the bone-basket of our ribs,

its momentum not yet interrupted

Tree

The next time a storm comes, set your eyes upon a tree.  The branches toss and turn, flail and bend – and wisely so, for what happens to things that don’t bend?

But then, beneath the boughs and limbs, the trunk.  And beneath that pillar of power and stability, the roots – firmly fixed to the earth.

 

Darren Main on the Source

“If you’re able to keep returning to your focus point (in meditation), you can move still deeper into the mind and experience the true Self, because underneath these three basic levels of consciousness (conscious mind, semi-conscious mind, unconscious mind) there is a fourth.  For simplicity, I’ll refer to it as the source.  It’s important to note that all minds originate from the same source point.  This point has many names originating in many cultures.  A simple Western name would be God.  Eastern names would include the Tao and Brahman.  Albert Einstein referred to this source as the Unified Field.  Whatever you call this Source, it’s important to remember that it exists within every mind.

This source point is the origin of all thought……it’s a formless thought of pure joy, bliss and love.  This thought is present within you at this very moment and at every moment, though it’s likely to be buried under layers of physical, emotional and psychological baggage.

It is this source point that we’re trying to realize when we practice yoga.”

-Darren Main, Yoga and the Path of the Urban Mystic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working With Coyote

C.M. Rivers

In working with Coyote – the trickster who tricks even himself – there can be no rigid thinking, no frame around the picture.  Perceptions are dissolved, expectations are deconstructed.  One must take oneself less seriously, welcome laughter, crack open the shell of one’s own ego.

An open heart is required, and it is like the open road: lending itself to endless possibilities, allowing whatever wants to come next to happen, inviting the mind to loosen its grip on everything it has convinced itself of, softening into fearlessness and deep listening.

The processes of nature, miracles all.  How full of folly we are, how powerful, how small.

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Quote from Iyengar

“Yoga teaches us to cure what need not be endured, and endure what cannot be cured.”

B.K.S. Iyengar